Best Friend Mobility Wheelchair

Best Friend Mobility Wheelchair
Best Friend Mobility Wheelchair
Best Friend Mobility Wheelchair
Best Friend Mobility Wheelchair

The best friend mobility dog wheelchair, is a fantastic cost effective solution for disabled dogs, or dogs that have completely lost the use of their rear legs due to disease or injury. If your dog still has rear leg mobility it is advisable to keep them walking normally for as long as possible, but with the assistance of a wheelchair that offers the option of the legs up or down. In this case please look at the Walkin Wheels Option.

Made from lightweight aluminum non-rust alloy with 14” all-terrain pneumatic wheels and waterproof Swiss bearings. This dog wheelchair includes the deluxe neoprene harness and also features padded shoulder support, triple-thronged adjustable neoprene shoulder harness. It has a fixed padded seat for comfort. Both male and female dogs can toilet as normal while in this wheelchair.

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Rehabilitation
  • Neurological problems like osteomyelitis or degenerative myelopathy
  • Fractured spine/back
  • Rear limb amputation or deformity
  • Ligamentous injury such as PCL or ACL
  • Thoracic or Lumbar disc injury
  • Any other condition that results in rear leg pain or weakness

PLEASE CHOOSE 'WHEELCHAIR SHIPPING' WHEN PURCHASING THIS ITEM WITHIN THE UK. 
PLEASE CONTACT US FOR A SHIPPING QUOTE TO SEND TO IRELAND, THE REST OF EUROPE AND WORLDWIDE.

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SIZING GUIDE

 

PICK YOUR PET’S WHEELCHAIR SIZE

 

MEASURE YOUR PET

Measuring your pet to determine which size Best Friend Mobility wheelchair will best fit is the quickest and easiest thing.

The primary measurement required is the rear height, from the floor to the top of the back. Once you have this as your initial guide, you may need to consider the dog's weight to determine which size to select.

Depending on your pet’s current capabilities and its willingness to cooperate, measuring your dog can be a 1-person or 2-person job.

If your pet has very little or no rear-limb strength, one person can be the support while the other does the measuring.



Specs:

  • Lightweight adjustable aluminum frame (non-rust)
  • Non-rust stainless hardware—very simple and quick assembly
  • Deluxe neoprene front and rear harness for complete comfort
  • Designed and tested by K9 Orthopaedic surgeon
  • Easy hex wrench adjustment of height, length, and width
  • Pet can use the cart for assisted walking or full rear leg support—with zero rear leg weight bearing
  • Allows pet to use the bathroom while in cart
  • All-terrain polyurethane wheels with sealed bearings
  • Easy clip-on function front harness system

This cart is good for:

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Arthritis
  • Rehabilitation
  • Neurological problems like osteomyelitis or degenerative myelopathy
  • Fractured spine/back
  • Rear limb amputation or deformity
  • Ligamentous injury such as PCL or ACL
  • Thoracic or Lumbar disc injury
  • Any other condition that results in rear leg pain or weakness

FAQ

How will putting my pet on a wheelchair improve his or her health?

Getting your dog (or cat) on a wheelchair can help improve many aspects of your pet’s life tremendously. At the forefront are the more obvious physical benefits, your pet will be able to move around, toughen its remaining functional limbs, and fight the other signs of deterioration by improving overall health.

Then, there is also the emotional health aspect. Being unable to move around and feeling helpless is a sure downer, especially for once highly active pets. Giving your pet a chance to walk, run, play, and socialize will do wonders for your pet’s attitude and outlook, which in turn will reflect on his or her physical well-being as well.

How long will it take for my pet to get used to the wheelchair?

Every pet is different. Some pets take to mobility aids the almost instantly while others will need a bit more time to get used to the idea and the actual physical sensation of being on one.

Many other factors such as a pet’s age, the condition it suffers from, general health and strength, and even personality can determine the length of time a pet will take to get comfortable in a wheelchair. Observe you pet closely and follow the notes on the manual.

Can my pet go down steps while on a wheelchair?

Yes. Your pet can go up and down some steps with help and supervision.

How long can my pet stay in the wheelchair?

If your pet is just starting out on a wheelchair, we recommend short durations to get them used to being on one and to strengthen their forelegs. The basic regimen is a 10-minute session of walking while on the wheelchair over a hard surface, twice a day for the first few days. You can increase the sessions to three times a day once your pet has adapted. As your pet develops more strength, you can extend the time it spends on the wheelchair based on its stamina.

An important thing to keep in mind is that pet wheelchairs are not intended for use for long durations. Make the most out of them for your pet by using the wheelchairs for trips outside, playing, socialization, and exercise. After plenty of activity, your pet will most likely be ready to rest and relax at home and off the wheelchair. You also get your pet on the wheelchair more often in a day if he or she needs it.

Can my pet relieve himself/herself while in the wheelchair?

Yes. Our wheelchair is designed in a way that will not hamper your pet’s ability to relieve itself. Being on the wheelchair and going for a walk also reinforces their "bathroom” schedule.

Will a wheelchair-bound dog be able to interact with other healthy dogs?

Definitely. Socialization is one of the key benefits in getting a handicapped pet a wheelchair. While non-wheelchair dogs may be uneasy around a wheelchair in the beginning, they soon get over it and get down to the business of playing.

Can the wheelchair be used in various terrains?

You can your take your wheelchair-bound pet to a grassy park, the beach, pebbly lakesides, or tramping in snow. Just keep in mind that supervision is key particularly in rougher terrains as bumps and ruts can tip the wheelchair over.


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